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Properties of A Sculpture In Bronze

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The intricate properties of a sculpture in bronze lend a hand in its durability and long standing popularity in the art world. The creation process is unique and lengthy, requiring the expertise of a knowledgeable art professional. From indoor to outdoor pieces a sculpture in bronze can withstand the test of time while representing this material's natural beauty.

This desirable metal has remained in high use for many years due to its strength and visual appeal. Evidence of its creative use dates back to long ago within the Greek and Roman civilizations. While the Greeks are said to have introduced large scale pieces there are few in existence to be viewed today. The Roman figures were a bit luckier as many have endured the test of time. Bronze sculptures originating from the Greek culture were frequently melted down to create ancient wartime weaponry and statuesque pieces to celebrate their successful confrontations. Those that have survived have been carefully preserved and protected in museum exhibits worldwide.

Many may wonder why a sculpture in bronze is preferred rather than one constructed of materials such as ceramic or copper. This metal is comparatively firmer and incredibly resilient to deterioration and the other effects of environmental conditions such as temperature fluctuations. It lacks a fragileness that other options may possess, yet it melts with ease allowing for the detailed creation of both large and small figures. This material is easy to work with as it increases in size when heated allowing it to capture every minute feature of a particular mold. On the other hand, it tends to contract just enough as its temperature decreases to be easily removed from the casting. These properties and advantages have highly contributed to its use in everything from candlesticks to monumental figures and memorials.

When an artist works to create an original sculpture in bronze there is an extensive series of steps that must be carried out. First and foremost, a realistic representation of the desired piece must be created out of clay. It is sent to a reputable foundry that will then produce a plaster or more flexible rubber mold of the statue. It is then coated in fiberglass to add sturdiness to the mold itself. This mold is taken off the clay piece and reassembled. The process continues, as one mold is not sufficient. The bronze casting is overturned and filled with a hot wax. During the gating phase, the original rubber pattern is removed and gates, or rods of wax, are attached to provide entry for the bronze into the mold’s interior. The wax mock-up is immersed in a liquid ceramic material to create the last casting. The wax must then be completely eliminated from the mold through the added gates. Melted bronze at an extreme heat of 2200 degrees Fahrenheit is finally dispensed into the ceramic cast and left to cool. Upon removal of the ceramic exterior the artist can add any desired finishing touches to the sculpture in bronze. A bronze patina may be added to create a desired color or unique appearance. Lastly, the piece is waxed to ensure long term protection. Such a statue can potentially have a long life when treated with care. Some may prefer to dust and wax their own on a regular basis, while others may enjoy the changes that can occur in the patina due to various elements.

While few historic pieces remain, there are many artists creating timeless pieces today for both personal and commercial use. From small to large statues, each has its own unique beauty.


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